Tuesday 25, September 2018
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Pool & Spa Care Help!


Everyone knows pools & spas are a lot of fun and help us to relax, but when things go wrong, they can be anything but fun and relaxing. It's for this reason that we, here at Best Pools, have taken the time to condense some of our decades of experience into several helpful blog posts in order for you to have expert maintenance and troubleshooting information right at your fingertips! Each post describes an individual topic or procedure with detailed instructions and information to help you better understand. Just one more reason why Best Pools is the Best!
CHLORINE POOL CARE
 
The following is a general schedule of maintenance for a pool using chlorine tablets as it's primary sanitizer . Some things are listed as being done daily. This is only the case if you are completely new to maintaining a swimming pool. Once you have built confidence in your abilities, then you may scale them back to once or twice a week. This is by no means a comprehensive schedule. Your pool and location may require more or less attention. This schedule does provide good universal fundamentals which are always useful and make up the core of Pool Care.

Yearly
Every spring, when you have opened the pool, run your pool for 24 hours, then bring in roughly a
12 Oz. bottle of your pool water to Best Pools to have the following tested.
Calcium Hardness: Ideal Range is 175 - 225 PPM. This chemical prevents scale deposits from developing on your liner.
Total Alkalinity: Ideal Range is 100 - 150 PPM. Total Alkalinity keeps your PH from bouncing up and down.
Chlorine Stabilizer (Cyan uric Acid): Ideal Range is 40-60 PPM. This chemical makes the chlorine released by your tablets more resistant to depletion by way of the sun.

Weekly
Add 1 Lb of Shock (Active Ingredient: Calcium Hypochlorite) per 10000 gallons. As with all granular chemicals, shock must be dissolved in a bucket of water before being added to the pool. Shock granules can bleach vinyl liners and also cause leaks, if not properly dissolved. DO NOT use the pool for 8 to 10 hours after shocking. Swimming in this time can bleach hair and skin. It can also irritate the eyes and the skin. (The evening is the best time to shock once you are done swimming for the day. This way the shock can do it's job while you sleep.)
If using a weekly algaecide, add your proper dosage. If you are unsure what to add, your friendly neighborhood pool store can help!
Check your chlorine floater or automatic chlorinator. Be sure you have a few tablets inside. If you are unsure how many to add, put 2-3 three inch tablets in and continue reading to find out how you can figure out your perfect amount.

Daily
Test your chlorine level. This lets you know whether you are using too many tablets or too few. If your level is low, adjust your chlorinator to a higher output. (Floating chlorinators usually have a vent on the bottom that twists to change the output.) If it's VERY low, check your chlorinator to confirm that you do have tablets inside and add 1-2 more tablets. If chlorine is to high, adjust your chlorinator output or remove tablets.
Test Your PH Level: Maintaining proper PH prevents many problems and allows your other chemicals to function optimally. PH is adjust with two chemicals, PH Up and PH down, to bring the PH up or down accordingly.

Always dissolve granular chemicals! Mix them in a bucket of water before adding to the pool!


IONIC POOL CARE
 
The following is a general schedule of maintenance for a pool using an ionizer as it's primary sanitizer. Some things are listed as being done daily. This is only the case if you are completely new to maintaining a swimming pool. Once you have built confidence in your abilities, then you may scale them back to once or twice a week. This is by no means a comprehensive schedule. Your pool and location may require more or less attention. This schedule does provide good universal fundamentals which are always useful and make up the core of pool care.

Yearly
Every spring, when you have opened the pool, run your pool for 24 hours, with the ionizer set on 50. (Some models use a different scale for output. The idea is to set it to about medium output)
Bring roughly a 12 Oz. bottle of your pool water to Best Pools to have the following tested:
Calcium Hardness: Ideal Range is  175 - 225 PPM. This chemical prevents scale deposits from developing on your liner.
Total Alkalinity: Ideal Range is 80 - 100 PPM. Total Alkalinity keeps your PH from bouncing up and down and allows it to maintain a semi-steady range.
Copper Level: Ideal Range is 0.3 PPM. Copper is your primary defense against microbial life-forms (Algae) from forming in your pool. It can maintain it's level pretty well over the winter so checking at start up helps you know how to most efficiently use your ionizer.

Weekly
Add 1 Lb of Shock (Active Ingredient: Calcium Hypochlorite) per 10000 gallons. As with all granular chemicals, shock must be dissolved in a bucket of water before being added to the pool. Shock granules can bleach vinyl liners and also cause leaks, if not properly dissolved. DO NOT use the pool for 8 to 10 hours after shocking. Swimming during this time can bleach hair and skin. It can also irritate the eyes and the skin. (The evening is the best time to shock after you are done swimming for the day. This way the shock can do it's job while you sleep.)

Daily
Test Your Copper Level. Maintaining a good copper level is critical to your pools clarity. This is something you want to be very familiar with. If the level is too high or low adjust your Ionizer output accordingly. Try to keep in mind how far down the Copper Level scale you want to go down or up when adjusting your output. For example, if your Copper is reading 0.6 PPM and your Ionizer is set to 50, then you would want to turn your ionizer to 25 because 0.6 PPM is twice as much as 0.3 which would mean you want half the output.
Test Your PH Level: Ideal Range is 7.0 - 7.2 Maintaining proper PH prevents many problems and allows your other chemicals to function optimally. PH is adjusted with two chemicals, PH Up and PH down, to bring the PH up or down accordingly.

Always dissolve granular chemicals! Mix them in a bucket of water before adding to the pool!

SALT POOL CARE
 
The following is a general schedule of maintenance for a pool using salt generation as it's primary sanitizer. Some things are listed as being done daily. This is only the case if you are completely new to maintaining a swimming pool. Once you have built confidence in your abilities, then you may scale them back to once or twice a week. This is by no means a comprehensive schedule. Your pool and location may require more or less attention. This schedule does provide good universal fundamentals which are always useful and make up the core of Pool Care.

Yearly
Every spring, when you have opened the pool, run your pool for 24 hours, then bring a roughly 12 Oz. bottle of your pool water to Best Pools to have the following tested.
Calcium Hardness: Ideal Range is  175 - 225 PPM. This Chemical prevents scale deposits from developing on your liner.
Total Alkalinity: Ideal Range is 100 - 150 PPM. Total Alkalinity keeps your PH from bouncing up and down.
Chlorine Stabilizer (Cyan uric Acid): Ideal Range is 40-60 PPM. This Chemical makes the chlorine generated by your Salt System more resistant to depletion by way of the sun.
Salt: Ideal Range is 3000 PPM. Salt is Critical to your success in pool care. Common Table salt is used by your Salt System to generate chlorine in your pool water. 


Weekly
Check the Control Unit and make sure the Auto Setting is engaged, otherwise you will have to use the Super Chlorinate Setting once a week. This process temporarily boosts chlorine output so that it breaks down the microscopic remnants of what your Salt System kills throughout the week.
If using a weekly algaecide, add your proper dosage. If you are unsure what to add, your friendly neighborhood pool store can help!
Check your salt level on the Read Out Display within the control unit. Add salt as per the level and your pool's capacity. You also want to add 1 Lb of Chlorine Stabilizer per 50 Lbs of salt, in order to maintain a proper Cyan uric Acid (CYA) level and reduce unnecessary salt usage.

Daily
Test Your Chlorine Level. This lets you know whether your Salt System is working effectively. If your level is low of high, adjust the output percentage accordingly.
Test Your PH Level: Maintaining proper PH prevents many problems and allows your other chemicals to function optimally. PH is adjusted with two chemicals, PH Up and PH down, to bring the PH up or down accordingly.

Always dissolve granular chemicals! Mix them in a bucket of water before adding to the pool!

BROMINE SPA CARE
 
Using Bromine in Your Spa
Every 4 months drain your spa completely. Clean the filter, then refill your spa.

Start Up
Add 2 Oz. of Sodium Bromide.
Test and adjust your PH to 7.4 using the appropriate chemicals.
Shock the spa with roughly a capful of GLB Oxy-Brite Shock.
Put 3 to 4 bromine tablets in the Floater. Adjust the Floater to be half open.


Weekly
Shock with 1 capful of  GLB Oxy-Brite Shock.
Test your PH and Bromine Several times throughout the week. Adjust as needed.
As Needed

If the spa develops a foam on the surface, use a little Foam Down.
When the water starts to look a little dull, add some Bright-N-Clear.
If you find a hard build-up on the shell of your spa, Spa Defender will help reduce the scale build-up.


NATURE 2 SPA CARE
 

Every 4 months drain your spa completely. Clean the filter, then refill your spa.

Start Up
Add a Nature2 Cartridge to your filter. Most filters have an opening in the center that can house the cartridge. If your filter does not have an opening, then you can place the cartridge into the skimmer.
Test and adjust your PH to 7.4 using the appropriate chemicals.
Add 2 tablespoons of Sodium Di-Chlor Granule Chlorine. This chemical activates the Nature2 cartridge and helps it dispense the sanitizing minerals.

Weekly
Shock with 2 tablespoons of of  GLB Oxy-Brite Non-chlorine Shock.
Test your PH. Adjust as needed in order to achieve a reading of 7.4
Before or After Each Use
Add 2 tablespoons of non-chlorine shock. (GLB Oxy-Brite) 
As Needed

      If the spa develops a foam on the surface, use a little Foam Down.
      When the water starts to look a little dull, add some Bright-N-Clear.
      If you find a hard build-up on the shell of your spa, Spa Defender will help reduce this scale build-up.

      If you notice an oily build-up on the surface of the water, you can use a small floating sponge, like the Dirty Duck.

MAINTENANCE
 
The purpose of this publication is to familiarize you with your pool's equipment and maintenance tools. Your pool has three pieces of equipment that are always in use while your pool is open. These are your skimmer, pump, and filter. Your skimmer is the white box on the side of your pool wall that draws water in. Your pump is the part that moves your water. If you follow the hose from the bottom of the skimmer, it will lead you to the smaller strainer basket on the front of the pump. The last piece of equipment is your filter. The filter is the large grey ball with many hoses running to and from it. One hose will run to the wall of the pool. This hose is connected to the Return Jet. The Return Jet pushes the clean water from your filter into your pool and circulates the water. Its important to know what is what because if you need help with anything, you can properly describe where the problem is.

The Skimmer
There are 2 sets of screws along the side of your skimmer. These will help you gauge your water level. You want your water level to be just above the top set of screws.
Check the basket in the skimmer daily. The basket collects floating debris and if it gets too full, it will restrict the flow of water to your pump and filter and can cause a lot of wear and tear on both. Always turn the pump off before you remove the basket. Leave the pump off until the basket is back in place. This will make the basket easier to remove and help keep the strainer basket on the pump clean.

The Pump
Run your pump and filter 24 hours a day. This is best for your pool because running water doesn't like to turn green. Also, running the pump and filter 24 hours a day will extend the life of your pump. They are designed for constant use and the act of turning them off and back on adds more wear and tear then it would have received from running. If temperatures are below 80 degrees and you would like to shave your power bill down a little, you can run the pump and filter during the day and leave it off at night.
Check the strainer basket on the front of the pump once a month. If you have a lot of pine trees in your yard, you want to check the strainer once a week because pine needles will slip past the skimmer basket. To check the strainer basket;
Turn the pump off. 
Set your filter on the "Closed" setting (More on this below). 
Take out your skimmer basket and use a winter plug (Gizzmo) or a rag to plug the opening in the bottom. You have now stopped the flow of water to the pump.
You can now turn the pump lid and lift it off, providing access to the basket.

The Filter
Your filter has a small pressure gauge. Occasionally check it. The purpose of the pressure gauge, is to tell you when your filer needs to be backwashed. Your pressure should be between 10 - 15 PSI. It's important to note your pools regular PSI because it can vary from pool to pool. If the PSI goes 5 pounds above it's normal reading, then you need to backwash your filter. If the gauge doesn't go to zero when the pump is turned off, the gauge is bad and needs to be replaced.
On the top of the filter, there is a handle that points to one of seven different settings. Always turn the pump off when changing the settings. These settings are used for different purposes and are described below;
Filter: This is the setting your pool will run on the majority of the time. This setting filters and circulates your water.
Waste: This setting is used to drain water from the pool. When running on this setting, your water bypasses the filter and sends the water pumped from the skimmer out the waste line. This setting is useful to drain excess water from the pool after a heavy rain.
Closed: This setting restricts the flow of water to and from the filter. DO NOT RUN THE PUMP ON THIS SETTING. It is typically used when checking the pump strainer basket or making repairs on the pump.
Recirculate: This setting bypasses the filter and only circulates the water. There are very few uses for this setting. It is only used for special procedures.
Backwash: This setting cleans your filter. When your pressure rises and your water flow has slowed, use this setting. When running on this setting you want to keep an eye on the clear sight glass beside the waste line. While backwashing, you will notice this sight glass filling with dirty water and a little sand. This is normal. Watch the sight glass until it flows with clean water. Once you see clean water in the sight glass, turn the pump off and switch the filter to the Rinse setting.
Rinse: This setting is used to clear the lines after backwashing. After you have run the backwash setting, run the pool on rinse for roughly 15 seconds. Water will come from your waste line just as it did on Backwash.
Winter: The Winter setting is only used when shutting the pool down for winter. After the pool is winterized, set the filter on the winter setting to protect the mechanism from damage due to cold temperatures.
Maintenance Tools
Telescoping Pole: The telescoping pole is used to attach other tools to.
Leaf Net: There are many different types of nets. Some are flat for skimming the surface. Others have a deep bag for collecting large quantities of debris.
Thermometer: Your thermometer lets you know the temperature in your pool. Think of it as a comfort meter.
Brush: Use this to scrub algae and stubborn debris from your liner. If you have green on your walls or floor, it's a great idea to brush it lose into the water before shocking.
Manual Vacuum: Your manual vacuum is made up of three parts. A vacuum head, a vacuum hose, and a skim-vac adapter. When vacuuming, your filter stays on the "Filter" setting. Instructions for using them is as follows:
Attach the vac-head to your pole.
Attach the vacuum hose to your vacuum head. If your hose has an end the swivels, that is the part which is supposed to go on the vacuum head. Put the skim-vac on the other end of the hose.
Sink your vacuum head into the pool. Take the skim-vac on the end of the vacuum hose and hold it up to the return jet. Let the jet push all the air out of the hose. The vacuum head will rise off the floor a little as the bubbles are pushed out.
Once the bubbles have stopped, keep the skim-vac under the water as much as possible and put it over the skimmer basket. Most skim-vacs will fit through the front of the skimmer, although sometimes you have to remove the flapper door. If it will not fit through the front, quickly lift the skim-vac up and put it through the top opening.
While vacuuming, if you lose suction, you will need to backwash the filter and clean the skimmer basket. Turn the pump off, remove the skim-vac, backwash, and then reconnect. You may have to push the air from the hose again after backwashing.
When done, turn the pump off and remove the vacuum equipment.  Clean the skimmer basket and backwash the filter.


GREEN OR CLOUDY POOL
 

GREEN POOLS


1.CLEAN OUT AS MUCH DEBRIS AS POSSIBLE. (BRUSH WALLS AND FLOOR, VACUUM, AND BACKWASH, OR CLEAN CARTRIDGE FILTER.

2.DISSOLVE AND ADD 3 LBS OF SHOCK PER 10,000 GALLONS OF WATER. (FOR BAQ, SS, OR POLY USERS, USE 1 GALLON OF SHOCK AND A DOUBLE DOSE OF ALGECIDE PER 10,000 GALLONS.)

3.RUN PUMP CONTINUOUSLY FOR 24 HOURS.

4.REPEAT STEP 2 IF THE POOL HAS CHANGED BUT ALL GREEN IS NOT GONE. DOUBLE STEP 2IF THAT DID NOT CHANGE THE POOL COLOR AT ALL.


CLOUDY POOLS

SAND AND D.E. FILTERS


FOR HAZY POOLS THAT YOU CAN SEE THE BOTTOM

1.USE 4oz OF CLARIFYER PER 10,000 GALLONS OF WATER, POUR DIRECTLY INTO THE SKIMMER AND REPEAT DAILY UNTIL CLEAR.

2.DO NOT BACKWASH UNTIL THE WATER PRESSURE IN THE POOL IS VERY WEAK.

3.ALWAYS CHECK PRESSURE BEFORE ADDING CLARIFYER.


FOR VERY CLOUDY POOLS THAT YOU CAN NOT SEE THE BOTTOM.

DURING THIS PROCESS PLEASE HAVE YOUR GARDEN HOSE ON AND IN THE SKIMMER. YOU WILL BE LOSING WATER

1.PUT THE FILTER ON RECIRCULATE.

2.ADD 1 BOTTLE OF FLOCK OR DROP-N-VAC PER 10,000 GALLONS. (POUR ALL OVER THE SURFACE OF THE POOL)

3.ALLOW POOL TO CIRCULATE FOR 1 HOUR FOR ABOVE GROUND POOLS AND 2 HOURS FOR IN-GROUND POOLS.

4.TURN OFF PUMP

5.AFTER 16-24 HOURS, MOST IF NOT ALL DEBRIS SHOULD BE ON THE FLOOR OF THE POOL. QUICKLY TURN ON PUMP AND HOOK UP VACUUM

6.TURN OFF PUMP, SWITCH FILTER TO WASTE, TURN PUMP BACK ON AND MAKE SURE VACUUM IS STILL CONNECTED.

7.START VACUUMING VERY SLOWLY, IF DEBRIS STARTS STIRING UP, TURN PUMP OFF UNTIL DEBRIS SETTLES AGAIN.


CLOUDY POOLS

CARTRIDGE FILTERS


FOR HAZY POOLS THAT YOU CAN SEE THE BOTTOM

1.USE 4oz OF CLARIFYER PER 10,000 GALLONS OF WATER, POUR DIRECTLY INTO THE SKIMMER AND REPEAT DAILY UNTIL CLEAR.

2.DO NOT CLEAN FILTER UNTIL THE WATER PRESSURE IN THE POOL IS VERY WEAK.

3.ALWAYS CHECK PRESSURE BEFORE ADDING CLARIFYER.


FOR VERY CLOUDY POOLS THAT YOU CAN NOT SEE THE BOTTOM.

DURING THIS PROCESS PLEASE HAVE YOUR GARDEN HOSE ON AND IN THE SKIMMER. YOU WILL BE LOSING WATER

1.REMOVE CARTRIDGE FILTER

2.ADD 1 BOTTLE OF FLOCK OR DROP-N-VAC PER 10,000 GALLONS. (POUR ALL OVER THE SURFACE OF THE POOL)

3.ALLOW POOL TO CIRCULATE FOR 1 HOUR FOR ABOVE GROUND POOLS AND 2 HOURS FOR IN-GROUND POOLS.

4.TURN OFF PUMP

5.AFTER 16-24 HOURS, MOST IF NOT ALL DEBRIS SHOULD BE ON THE FLOOR OF THE POOL. QUICKLY TURN ON PUMP AND HOOK UP VACUUM

6.TURN OFF PUMP, BLOCK OFF RETURN AND TAKE PLUG OFF FILTER, TURN PUMP BACK ON AND MAKE SURE VACUUM IS STILL CONNECTED.

7.START VACUUMING VERY SLOWLY, IF DEBRIS STARTS STIRING UP, TURN PUMP OFF UNTIL DEBRIS SETTLES AGAIN.



SAND CHANGE
 
How to change the sand in a Sand Filter
Tools/Materials Needed
Flat-Head/Phillips-Head Screwdriver
Plastic Cup
Garden hose
Silicone Lubricant
Pool Filter Sand
Skimmer & Return Plugs
Optional: Wet-Dry Vac

Changing the Sand

Block the skimmer and return with your plugs. (If you don't have plugs, rags will work.)
Disconnect the 3 hoses at the filter head by loosening the hose clamps with your screwdriver.
Where the filter head meets the tank of the filter, there is a clamp. If you look around it, you will find a pair of nuts and bolts on opposite sides of one another. Use your screw driver to remove them and the clamp will come off in two pieces. Be sure to place the nuts and bolts in a safe place. The best way to keep everything in one place is to thread the nuts back on to the bolts after they've been removed. (If you do not find bolts, your filter head may be threaded and will need to be unscrewed from the tank. If you have any doubt, call Best Pools with a model number and/or as much information as you can find.)
Lift the head from the tank, but do not jerk or pull it abruptly. The filter head is still connected to important relatively sensitive parts that can be broken. If the filter head is difficult to remove, wiggle it while pulling up slightly. Once this piece is removed you will see a tube standing up from the center of the tank surrounded by sand. This tube is what your filter head was connected to.
Remove the sand. Use a Wet-Dry Vac to suck out the sand. If you do not have a Wet-Dry Vac, Gently turn the tank on it's side and use your garden-hose and hands to wash out the old sand. 
Once the sand is removed, you will see the tube in the center of the tank's opening leads to a set of smaller, finger-like tubes at the bottom of the tank. These fingers are what we have taken so much care not to break. Unscrew the fingers or some may be hinged and bend upwards. Remove the tube and fingers and clean them with your garden hose. 
Rinse out the tank and return it to its normal standing position.
Return the tube and the fingers to the inside of the tank and put the fingers back into position.
Cover the top of the tube with a plastic cup to keep the open end for the filter head covered. Fill the tank roughly half full with water.
SLOWLY pour the new sand into the tank, frequently stopping to re-center the tube. The tube has to stay centered, otherwise the filter head will not fit back onto the tank properly. You can check for fit by placing the head on the tube and gently moving it until its positioned. Once the tube is stable and no longer able to move on its own, you may pour the rest of the sand in. (Be sure to use pool filter sand! Any other will damage or destroy your filter!)
Fill the tank completely with water and clean any spilled sand away from the area where the tank and the filter head meet.
Apply a thin layer of your silicone lubricant to the filter head o-ring. (Always use silicone based lubricants! Vaseline and other petroleum based lubricants cause the o-ring to wear much faster than it would otherwise.)
Re-install the filter head, clamp, and hoses reversing the above mentioned methods.
Remove the skimmer and return plugs.
Backwash the filter before returning it to the filter setting. A handful or two of sand coming out is normal. If you notice a large quantity of sand in the pool, you may have damaged the internals of your filter. Seek professional help from your friendly neighborhood pool store!


WINTERIZING 
 
The day before closing your pool and if you are using chlorine tabs or an ionizer, add a regular dose of shock. (Regular dose = 1 lb per 10000 Gallons)
On the day you are going to close your pool, make sure the pool water is clear and free of leaves or other debris. (The cleaner you close it, the cleaner it will open.)


Add the winter chemical kit. For Chlorine, Salt and Ionized pools, the kit will have 3 chemicals; stain & scale preventative, winter shock, and winter algaecide. Dissolve each chemical and add to the pool one at a time. For Polyclear, Baquacil, and Softswim pools, add a normal dose of shock and sanitizer, as well as a double dose of algaecide.
Run the Pool for 1 hour.
If you are not using a special skimmer plug or cover (I.E. a gizzmo, or aquador), you can SKIP this step!  Drain the pool 1 inch below the skimmer. The best way to drain the pool is to connect the manual vacuum and run the filter on the Waste Setting with the vacuum head resting on the floor of the pool.
Remove the eyeball from the return fitting inside the pool. Replace it with a threaded plug. (The eyeball should come out in 3 pieces, leaving an opening with threads inside it on the inside of the pool. Sometimes only 2 pieces unthread leaving a part in the wall. A special Return Key is made to easily take this last piece out without damage.
Remove all hoses from the pool, pump, and filter by loosening the hose clamps with a screw driver or nut driver.
Remove all drain plugs from the pump and filter. (If the pump has no drain plugs, tilt it forward. If you removed the hoses as per the above instruction, all the water should pour out the hose connectors.) 
Be sure to remove the pressure gauge and sight glass from the filter. Also set the filter on the Winter setting. (If you don not have a winter setting on your filter, set the handle between two settings) If you are using an Ionizer, remove your electrodes. Take care to use the wire connectors. Unscrewing the electrode screws is not recommended.
Place the pump & hoses indoors (a shed is fine.) You may cover the filter with trash-bags to protect it from the elements. All small items (drain plugs, sight glass, etc.) should be placed in the pump basket so they don't get lost over the winter.
Float the winter cover on top of the water with enough slack to allow for expansion and rain-water. If you are using air pillows, float them to the center of the pool and secure them before putting the cover on. (More detailed instructions for putting the cover on the pool are included with the cover.) Secure the cover on the pool using the cable and winch.
During the winter, please keep water and debris off the top of the cover. Maintaining 1 inch of water on the top is OK because it will keep the wind from whipping the cover off on a windy day, but no more than that. Keeping the cover clean helps the cover last from year to year and makes opening easier. Debris can be removed with the leaf net and brush on the end of your extendable pole. Water can be siphoned off the cover with a garden hose, a sump pump, or a Cover Saver siphon pump.
Instructions for Opening
When Spring arrives and you're ready to open your pool, make sure the cover is free of water and debris. Remove and clean your cover with a garden hose. Let the cover dry then fold it and store it safely for next winter.
 Hook up the pump, filter, and hoses. Replace all drain caps, sight glass, and pressure gauge. 
Set the filter on the Filter Setting.
Remove the skimmer plug and threaded return plug.
Replace the skimmer basket and replace the eyeball. Set the eye at a roughly 45 degree angle down and away from the skimmer.
Fill the pool to the second screw on the skimmer face-plate, if necessary. Let the pool run for 24 hours, then bring roughly a 12 Oz. bottle of pool water to Best Pools!


 
Didn't Find what you need?  Even though we've provided you with all the basic maintenance information and solutions to the most common issues on this page, unfortunately we could not write everything down and some things just cannot be condensed into a blog. After-all, if we spent all our time writing guides, we couldn't spend as much time on what we do best; Building the best swimming pools and serving our customers. Try giving us a call or stop on by during business hours and one of our friendly employees will be happy to assist you!
 
 

 



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